The Bluesbox Collection

1967 Harmony H64 Thinline Electric

The top and back are quilted maple. Note in this image, the vintage Grover tuners that came on the guitar. This close up view shows some of the restoration. For instance, the pickguard was purchased from Broadway Music, which is the main distributor for the latest version of the Harmony brand. The pick-ups, which can also be seen in this view, are DeArmond Maximum - which were the best they had to offer at the time. I am aware that a lot of Harmony owners tend to change these out for Gibson style humbuckers, which have a "fatter" sound and are louder. Personally, I like the DeArmonds because they have a unique tone all their own. The tailpiece, seen in closeup here, was fashioned by yours truly. A past owner had tried to mount a Les Paul style "stop" tailpiece, and I assume, found that the top of this guitar would not support such a device. Unfortunately, the fool had already drilled the holes for the tailpiece, so when I received the guitar it had these ugly holes in the face. I covered the holes and then fashioned this tailpiece crossbar with extra depth and width to hide the evidence. The original tailpiece would have been a Bigby vibrato, by the way. I may put one on it later. I faced the peg head with some tortoise shell material. This is in keeping with several high-end Harmony models (although not this particular one). I also found the Harmony logo decal on eBay. When I received this guitar, the head was all scratched up where (no doubt the same) previous owner had tried to obliterate the fact that this was a Harmony guitar. It looks like he (or she) was trying to turn it into a Gibson ES335.

I really like this guitar a lot. The look is deliciously retro, and the tone is unique - kind of a cross between an LP and a Gretsch semi-hollow. It has that Gretsch-style twang, but is smoother. The neck is one of the thinnest I have ever played, and because it is a bolt on, I can flex it to create a nice vibrato.


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